• 0 30 Years in at Battersea Dogs home

    • News
    • by Battersea.co.uk
    • 13-11-2016
    4.50 of 2 votes

        The wonderful Laurence Ackland Smith – Battersea’s longest serving volunteer – has celebrated his 30th year of service with the Home.    Laurence – an avid dog lover – began volunteering as a dog walker on 16 October 1986 as his son was allergic to dogs, meaning they could not have one at home. Since then, Laurence has donated 12,000 hours of his time, walking dogs for approximately 7,500 miles or roughly 290 marathons! Battersea’s Director of Operations Peter Laurie and Head of Volunteering & Fostering Charlotte Fielder awarded a Certificate of Achievement to Laurence, who explained it was his “love of dogs and the appreciation from the charity” that has kept him volunteering with the Home for so long. Upon accepting his certificate, Laurence gave a few words beginning with “If you think this is a retirement speech, it isn’t!”.  These days Laurence particularly looks forward to the Home’s monthly visits to the Chelsea Pensioners at the neighbouring Royal Hospital, providing the pensioners with cuddles and interactions from our dogs.  Laurence started visiting the Royal Hospital in 2010 and has become such a firm favourite with staff and the pensioners that they threw an additional party for him during his visit last week.   A hero at Battersea Thanks to important funding from the generous players of People’s Postcode Lottery, Battersea is able to recognise and reward the achievements of its volunteers.  Charlotte Fielder, Battersea’s Head of Volunteering & Fostering commented “Laurence is a hero at Battersea, not just because he has been volunteering with us for so long, but because he is such a committed, reliable and lovely person. He totally embodies the values of the Home and he continually demonstrates love, care and respect for our animals.”   If like Laurence, you would like to volunteer at any of the homes, you can visit here:     Battersea Dogs Home Volunteering

  • 1 Battersea Arts Center

    • Events
    • by Battersea.co.uk
    • 12-11-2016
    5.00 of 2 votes

    THE NIGHT THAT AUTUMN TURNED TO WINTER   Little Bulb Theatre Co-produced by Bristol Old Vic and Farnham MaltingsWeekdays 7-21 Dec and 3-6 Jan | 10:30am and 1:30pmAll other dates (inc. weekends) 11am and 2:30pmAdults £15, Children & Concs £10 | Family Ticket £44*Tickets include a programme worth £4For children aged 3-7   'Silliness and wonder...in bumper Christmas-size portions'★★★★ The Guardian  This Christmas, join award-winning Little Bulb Theatre (Antarctica) on an unforgettable woodland adventure with songs, silliness and plenty of audience interaction.Winter is on its way, and deep in the wild wood, animals of all shapes and sizes are busy getting ready for the cold season ahead. Spot the squirrels, find the fox and meet the hares on the night that their world turns into a magical snow shimmering wilderness.Little Bulb Theatre's previous shows for children include the sell-out  Antarctica in 2014. This year they will once again be performing as part of the CBeebies Christmas Show, recorded at The Sheffield Crucible Theatre. Their shows for adults include Extravaganza Macabre, Orpheus and Operation Greenfield.Running Time: 50 mins *£44 Family Ticket: Treat your nearest and dearest. See the show as a group of 4 people for £44. Just add 4 tickets to your basket (minimum 2 child tickets) and the discount will be applied automatically.Babes in Arms: We are happy for families to bring babes-in-arms up to the age of 18 months without a ticket. Any child older than this will require a seat and a ticket. Illustration by Dave Bain   Book Here

  • 1 Welcome to Battersea.co.uk

    • News
    • by Battersea.co.uk
    • 11-11-2016
    5.00 of 1 votes

      Welcome to the new site Battersea.co.uk. We hope to bring you lots of local news, offers  and information relevant to the local people and area. If you would like to contact us with requests or information you think might be interesting then please feel free to email us at:   info@battersea.co.uk   Thanks

  • 0 Still no news on cause of fire

    • News
    • by Battersea.co.uk
    • 11-11-2016
    3.00 of 1 votes

    There is still no news on what caused the massive fire  on an industrial estate in south west London a few months ago.  Police say they were called at 9.15pm on July 13th to the Parkfield Industrial Estate in Battersea.    No Injuries were reported. 

  • 0 Locals not keen on development idea

    • News
    • by Battersea.co.uk
    • 11-11-2016
    5.00 of 3 votes

    Dozens of residents have expressed their outrage at plans to build flats on a south London  “pocket park” used by children and mothers with babies. Developers want to construct a four-storey block with a total of five homes on a plot of land owned by Wandsworth council in a residential Battersea neighbourhood. Locals have said the loss of the space, dominated by a mature sycamore tree, would be the “thin end of the wedge” for London’s valued mini-parks. About 60 objections to the proposal from Languard Developments have been lodged with Wandsworth's planning department, the vast majority in the last weekend, when news of the plans spread around the community. One resident, Karlar Hrabar, said in her letter of objection: “I am appalled the council would consider losing this lovely park for a block of flats.”  A second, Fiona Lings, wrote: “People meet and use the pocket park frequently throughout the year.”  Another, Andrew Mullins, told the Standard: “There seems to be a growing trend for councils to offload public land for developers. It’s not a very big green space, but it’s important for an area that’s not very green at all. The big thing is we don’t feel properly consulted.”  The land is part of a wartime bombsite on the corner of Gowrie Road and Taybridge Road which has largely been filled in by Sixties bungalows, leaving only the park as surviving open space. A planning statement from the council, ahead of the park being put up for sale, says: “There are no site constraints relating to this parcel of land, which is not within a conservation area.” The plans show Languard propose three two-bedroom maisonettes and two one-bedroom flats with three storeys above ground and a basement.  Total living space of about 3,500 sq ft suggests the homes could be worth a combined £3 million at the local rate of about £800 per sq ft for Victorian family houses. New builds usually command higher prices than existing properties. The documents reveal three trees will be planted “in lieu of the sycamore that needs to be felled” and there will be a “living wall” on the block’s south side. The aim is “a new-build development in line with council policy producing a strong and clean contemporary building that will sit well within its immediate surroundings and provide very desirable residential accommodation.” Languard was unavailable for comment. The council said: “This is a very small, vacant and unused former Second World War bombsite, which has in the past had temporary homes built on it and more recently has been a haven for anti-social behaviour like street drinking and also a magnet for litter and flytips. It’s a small dead-end space covered in concrete, not grass, and no one could ever reasonably describe it as a green oasis.   Original Article Here

  • 0 Battersea then and now

    • News
    • by Battersea.co.uk
    • 11-11-2016
    4.67 of 3 votes

      A brief history of Battersea and where it stands today   Battersea was once famous for its vegetables, fruits, flowers, and pork. It was the generator and supplier of food for Londoners, and many other places across Britain. That was however way before industrialization changed the landscape for good. Later, it became the seat of industry and “power”, as Battersea, a tiny suburb on the Southern bank of River Thames, became a site for many  factories and mills, starting the 16th century.The easy access to water and transport made it perfect for development.  It got a vastly different look after the Industrial Revolution which metamorphosed Britain. The mostly residential inner-city district in the London borough of Wandsworth became galvanized by new industries and plants. It also got connected with other parts of the London through a powerful railway network that crisscrossed Battersea. During the later part of the nineteenth century, two locomotive works, one at Longhedge, and the other at Nine Elms were set up. There were also locomotive power depots, and this once largely agricultural manor with vast open, green spaces and arable lands become the center of town development. The population also exploded in the area as new civic buildings and government offices were constructed in the area. Today, it is known for Battersea Park, one of South London’s largest and main parks, and the riverside promenades, malls, and diverse range of architecturally-acclaimed private properties. Today, the once industrialized and maze-like suburb resembles any other upscale London residential zone. In the post-Second World War period, mainly after the 1970s, there was a clamor to return this place to its former state of calm and serenity. The unplanned factories, plants, and shops were demolished and many got relocated, and new well-planned apartment buildings replaced them on the skyline.  One of the most iconic buildings in the area is the Battersea Power Station which had been decommissioned in 1983 and has remained largely vacant until 2012. However, a new consortium of Malaysian builders has accepted the challenge to try and transform the iconic building into a residential cum luxury construction project with a large commercial space as well. Plans and visions for metamorphosing the building and resuscitating it had largely remained a fantasy and remained in the pipeline but the present set of designers and developers seem to be serious.  With the reinvention of Nine Elms residential zone, modern architectural marvels are starting to come up and it has started to resemble a well-planned “village” in London. Its property prices have started to resemble, and even rival, those of Chelsea or Kensington on the other side of the river Thames. History of Battersea Power Station The electricity supply in London and its suburbs till the 18th century was erratic and unreliable because there was a number of small but badly managed power stations who competed to keep the price down but didn’t fret over the quality of service. There were frequent power interruptions and load shadings. During the beginning of the 20th century, there was a lot of murmur and discussion in the parliament that electricity generation and supply should be nationalized and unified into a single system. Hence, a publicly owned power distribution system was incorporated. It was suggested in 1927, that a government-owned power station, be developed on the southern bank of the River Thames.  There was a countrywide protest against the decision because it was deliberated in many public forums that the new construction would lead to the creation of pollution in a city which was already reeling under the weight of years of unplanned industrialization and pollution. The realization had just dawned that pollution was a public health hazard and can’t be left unchallenged.  However, the parliament went ahead with their decision and the iconic Battersea Power Station was constructed in the 1930-1940s. It was completed in 1948 by the British Electric Authority and was commissioned in 1953. It produced around 400000 kilowatts of electricity and had the highest thermal efficiency. For over 30 years, it remained the largest thermal power station in the UK and was often referred to as the “Temple of Power”.  It is believed that the initial deco interior and grand design was planned by J Theo Halliday, but Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, the famous architect was brought onboard to complete the construction. He was responsible for the iconic four-chimney exterior façade of the building.  Modern Battersea tower  The modern tower will now be one of the most expensive luxury residential complexes in the metropolis. It will have penthouses which could each be priced over £6 million and studio flats which could be £400000 or even more. The tower will include luxury apartments constructed by such deferred names like Gehry Partners, Foster and Partners, and so on. The New Zone 1 will have a modern underground rail station and river bus services.  The development is being managed by Battersea Power Station Development Company Limited (BPSDC) and brings financial strength, expertise in real estate management and construction business to the table. The consortium has also received wholehearted support from the central government and the local civic authorities of London and Battersea. Most importantly, they are representing the dreams and aspirations of millions of Londoners and foreigners.  It will also have a number of offices, cafeterias, restaurants, leisure parks, and event spaces and an electric boulevard with an eclectic mix of businesses. It is expected to become a booming hub of commercial activities and residential area which would become the envy of other residential neighborhoods in London.  Apple to set up its new London campus in the iconic Battersea Power Station  Apple has already confirmed that it will lease out almost 40% of the total office space in the new building which will accommodate its entire 1400-strong team from existing London facilities under one room. Apple has termed it a unique opportunity to gather its entire team at one place which it believes will allow closer cooperation, collaboration leading to cutting-edge research and innovation.  Apple will occupy almost 5,00,000 square feet of office space across 6 floors of the central Boiler House of the historic building, and will, in all probability, move into its new campus in the year 2021.  Battersea Power Station’s brush with fame  Although the Battersea area has always been an important part of the history of modern Britain, it grabbed headlines globally and become a huge tourist attraction after it appeared on the cover of the famous English band Pink Floyd’s music album “Animals”, which was the band’s take on the prevailing socio-political situation at that time.  For the principal photography, an inflatable pink model pig was tethered to the southern chimney of the tower. The album became popular in the UK, the US, and many other countries, and received generally favorable reviews. Since then, Pink Floyd fans keep returning to this place and often treat it as a memorial or a mausoleum.  Battersea has had a chequered history. It has gone through spectacular ups and dramatic downs. It has been at the receiving end of a number of shifts in government policy and has always transformed with the changing public aspirations.  It is ready once again to change with new aspirations for a better life, cleaner environment, and more sustainable growth. Come and be a part of this new journey.  

  • 0 Beatbox Academy at Battersea Arts Centre

    • Events
    • by Battersea.co.uk
    • 11-11-2016
    5.00 of 1 votes

    Go and join in with a beginners group of beatboxers, singers, poets and MCs .They will help you practice the skills needed to beatbox. Sessions are led by beatboxer, musician and theatre-maker Conrad Murray.